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Harry Hirst

Consultant and Master Mariner Singapore T +65 6538 6660
harryhirst@incegd.com

Department Maritime Education (University) University of London. Sir John Moore University, Liverpool. Languages English

Harry Hirst

You, Harry Hirst
& Ince, in any case

Harry went away to sea after leaving school in 1975 and qualified as a Master Mariner in 1988. A graduate in both Nautical Studies and Law, he qualified as a solicitor in England in 1992 and has spent his entire legal career specialising in Admiralty law.

He moved to Asia in 1992 and now has over twenty five years’ experience in the region, advising ship owners and their insurers on their maritime casualties. As a qualified Master Mariner, he speaks and understands the language of mariners and those involved in the shipping industry, and has a holistic understanding of maritime operations and marine investigations.

Harry specialises in all aspects of Admiralty law including collision; salvage, total loss and wreck removal; pollution; fire and explosion; cargo shift, loss and damage; and general average. He has been involved in several of the most serious maritime incidents in Asia.

 

Legal Directory Quotes

HARRY IS DESCRIBED BY A CLIENT AS "A SEASONED ADMIRALTY PRACTITIONER WHO IS PARTICULARLY ERUDITE BUT WITH A PRAGMATIC APPROACH."

CHAMBERS ASIA 

SOURCES AGREE THAT “HE IS "AN EXTREMELY EXPERIENCED GUY" WHO IS "WELL REGARDED IN SHIPPING CIRCLES." 

CHAMBERS ASIA 

DESCRIBED BY ONE SOURCE AS "A GOOD GUY TO DEAL WITH."

 CHAMBERS ASIA 

Quote

LAUDED AS "ONE OF THE VERY FEW REAL SPECIALISTS IN ADMIRALTY WORK”

Professional Associations & Memberships

>  Law Society of England and Wales

>  Fellow of the Nautical Institute 

What you may not know about Harry

Harry is a keen sailor and owns a Colin Archer steel ketch

Accolades:
Chambers Asia – Singapore – Shipping International (Litigation): Band 1 recognition for 2017-2020

Matter highlights

  • ALNIC MC collision with the US John S. McCain, 
  • The Hebei Spirit in Korea, described as one of South Korea's worst oil spills ever.
  • Ocean Victory, one of the largest unsafe port claims of recent times.
  • The Neftegaz 67 /Yao Hai, a major collision in Hong Kong waters involving complex issues of causation and multiple crew fatalities. 
  • The Trans Summer, the sinking of a cargo ship in typhoon hit waters off Hong Kong. 
  • Pasha Bulker, a high-profile grounding off New South Wales, Australia.

My recent publications

Podcasts / 'Collisions: why are they still happening?' webinar series

01-07-2020 / Maritime

Webinar series, 'Collisions: why are they still happening?', hosted by the Ince Admiralty team. The series of four webinars explore the COLREGS and why collisions are still happening, and considers calls for changes to the COLREGS to accommodate autonomous ships. These webinars use a combination of case studies, Q&A and technical insight.

'Collisions: why are they still happening?' webinar series

News / COLREGS: Still fit for purpose?

15-04-2020 / Maritime

There has been much debate about the COLREGS over the last 12 months or so, with many suggesting that it is now time for not just some amendments but a total revision of the Rules. So are the COLREGS still fit for purpose?

COLREGS: Still fit for purpose?

News / Traffic Separation Schemes - Has crossing a traffic lane just become legally more onerous?

01-10-2019 / Maritime

The Singapore Court handed down judgment recently in the case of the collision between the Hanjin Ras Laffan and the Mount Apo: [2019] SGHC 57.

Traffic Separation Schemes  - Has crossing a traffic lane just become legally more onerous?

News / Traffic Separation Schemes - Has crossing a traffic lane just become legally more onerous?

01-10-2019 / Maritime

The Singapore Court handed down judgment recently in the case of the collision between the Hanjin Ras Laffan and the Mount Apo: [2019] SGHC 57.

Traffic Separation Schemes - Has crossing a traffic lane just become legally more onerous?

News / Apportioning liability for collisions at sea: The Dream Star – a good start for the Singapore Court

26-02-2018 / Maritime

On 12 September 2017, Ms Justice Belinda Ang Saw Ean handed down what is believed to be one of the first reported judgments of the Singapore High Court in a civil case (The Dream Star [2017] SGHC 220) involving a collision at sea, namely that between the Dream Star and the Meghna Princess, which occurred in Singapore waters on 16 May 2014. As the Lion City continues to develop as a regional maritime centre, Singapore is becoming an increasingly popular jurisdiction for the resolution of maritime disputes. Another Singapore Court decision in a collision matter is therefore to be welcomed, both as an addition to the growing body of local case law and to the common law library in general.

Apportioning liability for collisions at sea: The Dream Star – a good start for the Singapore Court

News / Singapore High Court cautions against misuse of VHF communications as means of avoiding collision

15-11-2017 / Maritime

The Dream Star 2017 SGHC 220 In a recent decision from the Singapore High Court on a trial on the issue of liability for a vessel collision, the Court re-emphasised that the misuse of Very High Frequency (VHF) communications may create uncertainty as to the status and responsibilities of vessels in complying with the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 1972 (COLREGS), and that this is a relevant factor to be considered when apportioning liability in collision cases

Singapore High Court cautions against misuse of VHF communications as means of avoiding collision